How Should I Store My Jase Case and Add-ons?

You recently made the proactive decision to purchase the Jase Case and some add-ons. This investment is a hedge against interrupted medication supplies due to natural disasters, travel to medically underserved regions of the world, and world events leading to extended drug shortages.

You want to protect our investment and the most important step is to store them properly.

To begin with, what is shelf life and expiration dates for?

Understanding shelf life and expiration dates- What’s the difference?

Shelf life: “The time period during which a drug product is expected to remain within the approved shelf-life specification, provided that it is stored under the conditions defined on the container label.”

Expiration date: The expiration date is the final day that the manufacturer guarantees the full potency and safety of a medication. U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturers are required by law to place expiration dates on prescription products prior to marketing. (many of these dates are arbitrary and are usually 1-5 years)

Shelf life and expiration dates are guidelines. Actual studies tell the whole picture.

Take doxycycline, for example:

Established in 1986, the Shelf-Life Extension Program a joint initiative of the FDA and Department of Defense tested 122 drugs for potency after their expiration date. Doxycycline (included in the Jase Case) maintained its potency well past 66 months- over 5.5 years. In fact, doxycycline potency has proven well beyond this time frame.

In fact, a paper from African Health Sciences titled” Drug expiry debate: the myth and the reality” revealed that of the drugs they tested “many drugs retain 90% of their potency for at least five years after the labeled expiration date, and sometimes longer. Even 10 years after the expiration date many pharmaceuticals retain a significant amount of their original potency.”

Below are the storage guidelines for most medications:

  • Don’t store your medicine in the bathroom or an area of the home of high humidity. Humidity can break down your medication and even change the medication’s chemistry. Packing your medication in a pouch with silica gel desiccants can help prevent moisture from ruining your medication.
  • Avoid extreme heat and cold. Both extremes can alter the chemistry or degrade the medication’s effectiveness. When traveling, keep medication on you or in your carry on. Don’t store it in your car for extended period of time.
  • Keep unused portions of medication in its original packaging. Whether that is the bottle or foil pouch it came in or was provided, doing this avoids contamination and excessive moisture build up.
  • Ideal places to store medications at home include dresser drawer, closet shelf or anywhere dark, dry and stays at room temperature. Always store with original label and out of reach of children and vulnerable adults (Alzheimer’s, dementia patients, etc.)

Jase Case and Jase add-ons storage guidelines

Jase Case

Store between 15°C and 30°C (59°F and 86°F)., and follow guidelines above (avoid excessive heat, cold, moisture and light).

If stored correctly, many antibiotics are still 90 percent or more potent even decades past their expiration date. See doxycycline post: “How Long do my Meds Last? A look at doxycycline”.

Jase Case add-ons

Below are the storage requirements/guidelines for Jase Case add ons:

Medication Use Don’t Freeze Ideal storage temperature/avoid excessive heat Notes
Acetaminophen Antipyretic (fever reducer), analgesic (pain reliever) X X Protect from light
Acetazolamide Acute altitude sickness, glaucoma (acute angle-closure)   X Protect from light
Albuterol HFA Bonchospasm, COPD exacerbation   Room temp or refrigerate Keep unused vials in foil pouch
Atovaquone-Proguanil Anti-malarial   X  
Celecoxib Acute pain (general, menstrual, gout)   X  
CiproDex Otic Otitis externa (swimmers ear) X X Protect from light
Dexamethasone Acute altitude/mountain sickness (moderate to severe), high altitude cerebral edema, asthma   X  
Diphenhydramine Allergic reaction, hives, insomnia, motion sickness, nausea/vomiting   X  
EpiPen Auto Injector Alpha/beta agonist X X Keep in plastic carrying tube,avoid excessive heat and protect from light
Famotidine Histamine H2 blocker X (liquid form) x Dispose of unused liquid form after 30 days
Fluconazole Vaginal candidiasis   X  
Hydroxyzine Insomnia, itching, hives   X Avoid excessive light
Ibuprofen Fever reduction, pain relief   X  
Ivermectin Antiparasitic, scabies   X  
Loperamide Acute and chronic diarrhea   X  
Methylprednisolone Corticosteroid   X  
Naloxone HCL nasal spray Opioid overdose X X Protect from light
(remains chemically stable even after 28 day extreme heat/thaw cycle)
Ofloxacin ophthalmic suspension Conjunctivitis
(bacterial)
  X Protect from light
Ondansetron Nausea/vomiting   X Can store in refrigerator
Oseltamivir Influenza X (don’t freeze suspension) x Suspension at room temp up to 5 days, in refrigerator up to 35 days
Permethrin Antiparasitic   X  
Salbutamol inhaler Increases air flow to lungs   X Store unused vials in foil pouch or refrigerator
Scopolamine patch Motion sickness   X Do not bend or roll patches
Silver Sulfadiazine Cream Topical antibiotic   X  
Triamcinolone cream Dermatitis, psoriasis X X  
Valacyclovir Herpes simplex   X  

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

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Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

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How Long Do My Meds Last? A Look at Metronidazole

Metronidazole is in a class of medications called nitroimidazole antimicrobials. It was initially developed at Rhone-Poulenc labs in France in 1959 to treat Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic infection. In 1962, it was discovered to be effective against both Trichomonas vaginalis  and bacterial gingivitis (bacteria). By the 1970s metronidazole was used for treatment of infections caused by gram-negative anaerobes such as bacteroides or gram-positive anaerobes such as clostridia. It is now widely used as a prophylaxis following bowel surgery to prevent infection. Metronidazole does not treat viruses or yeast infections- only bacterial and parasitic infections.

Jase Case Image

How long does Metronidazole remain potent?

When stored in a cool, dry, and dark area away from sunlight and capped, metronidazole can retain much of its potency well past expiration date. Exposure to UV light seems to degrade metronidazole more than extreme heat or cold.

Expiration dates reflect the time during which the product is expected to remain stable, or retain its identity, strength, quality, and purity, when it is properly stored according to its labeled storage conditions. Metronidazole can be used up to a year  past expiration date; however potency is affected. Contact your care provider before starting metronidazole if using past expiration date for further guidance. Metronidazole does not become toxic, just less potent.

Metronidazole is listed in the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medications for the newly released 2023 edition:

FIRST CHOICE (From WHO 2023 list)

  • Difficile infection
  • Complicated intraabdominal infections (mild to moderate)
  • Complicated intrabdominal infections (severe)
  • Necrotizing fasciitis
  • Surgical prophylaxis
  • Trichomoniasis

SECOND CHOICE (From WHO 2023 list)

  • Complicated intraabdominal infections (mild to moderate)

Other uses include

  • Bacterial vaginosis
  • Tetanus infection if no other better options are present.

How to take

Take metronidazole with food to avoid stomach upset. DO NOT consume alcohol or products containing propylene glycol  for 3 days after last metronidazole dose.  Do NOT take if you have taken disulfiram (Antabuse) within past 2 weeks.

Side Effects

Mild side effects include (can mostly be alleviated by taking with food)

  • Vomiting nausea, diarrhea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Constipation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Headache
  • Metallic taste in mouth
  • Mouth or tongue irritation

Discontinue and contact your primary care provider if you experience the following

  • Numbness, pain, burning, or tingling in your hands or feet
  • Seizures
  • Hives, peeling or blistering of skin
  • Problems with coordination,
  • Difficulty speaking, confusion, or agitation
  • Signs of infection such as sore throat, fever, or stuffy nose
  • Tarry stools

Consult with your care provider before taking if you are taking any of the following:

  • Let your care provider know if you are taking any of the following: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), busulfan (Busulfex, Myleran), cimetidine (Tagamet HB), lithium (Lithobid), phenobarbital, and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek)

Make your care provider aware if you currently have (or history of)

  • Pregnant or breastfeeding. Metronidazole has a pregnancy category B rating -Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. A substantial amount of metronidazole does pass into breast milk and can be passed to infant. There is some evidence that metronidazole can cause diarrhea and thrush in breastfed infants,, but studies are inconclusive. If metronidazole must be given, avoid breastfeeding foe 12-24 hours after dose.
  • Allergy to metronidazole, secnidazole (Solosec), tinidazole (Tindamax), any other medications, or any of the ingredients in metronidazole preparations.
  • Have history of Crohn’s disease, or blood, kidney, or liver disease.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

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Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

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How Long Do My Meds Last? A Look at Ciprofloxacin

(How about over 10 years past expiration?)

Ciprofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (flor-o-KWIN-o-lone) antibiotic, it is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections, and is used to treat biological warfare agent inhalation  Anthrax as a post exposure prophylaxis.

How long does ciprofloxacin remain potent?

When stored in a cool, dry, and dark area away from sunlight and capped, ciprofloxacin can retain much of its potency well past expiration date.

Expiration dates reflect the time during which the product is expected to remain stable, or retain its identity, strength, quality, and purity, when it is properly stored according to its labeled storage conditions. According to the Shelf-Life Extension Program, a joint initiative of the FDA and Department of Defense that tested 122 drugs for potency after their expiration date revealed ciprofloxacin maintained its active ingredients with no deterioration in strength for up to 142 months- over 10 years!

Ciprofloxacin is listed in the World Health Organization Model List of Medications for the newly released 2023 edition:

FIRST CHOICE (From WHO 2023 list)

  • Acute invasive bacterial diarrhea /dysentery
  • Enteric fever
  • Low-risk febrile neutropenia
  • Pyelonephritis or prostatitis (mild to moderate)

SECOND CHOICE (From WHO 2023 list)

  • Cholera
  • Complicated intraabdominal infections (mild to moderate)

In addition, ciprofloxacin can be used to treat:

  • Anthrax exposure
  • Tularemia
  • Urinary tract infection

How to Take

Take ciprofloxacin dose 2 hours before or 6 hours after taking other medicines. It may be taken with or without food. Drink plenty of liquids when taking ciprofloxacin.

Side Effects

Fluoroquinolones carry black box warning

Fluoroquinolones (FQ) have been associated with increased tendon ruptures. A tendon rupture is a partial or complete tear of a tendon.

A large study reviewing retroactive patient records was conducted between 2007 and 2016 with over a million subjects from the senior population age 65 and older. This study reviewed the use of FQ against other antibiotics and even similar drugs in the FQ class to assess tendon rupture occurrence.  Only one of the FQ antibiotics displayed a significant tendency to tendon rupture- between a 16% (rotator cuff) and fourfold risk (Achilles tendon). That antibiotic was levofloxacin. Neither ciprofloxacin-one of the antibiotics found in the Jase case- or moxifloxacin- which were part of the study- was found to increase tendon rupture.

For more information, please read this post: Does Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) cause tendon rupture?

What To Avoid

  • Do not take ciprofloxacin with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice.
  • Avoid antacids that contain calcium, magnesium, or aluminum (such as Maalox, Milk of Magnesia, Mylanta, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, Tums, and others).
  • Vitamin or mineral supplements that contain calcium, iron, magnesium, or zinc.
  • Ciprofloxacin can cause sun sensitivity. Avoid sunlight or tanning beds. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

Consult with your care provider before taking if you are taking any of the following:

For a more complete list of drugs that may interact with ciprofloxacin check out this site.

Make your care provider aware if you currently have (or history of)

  • Low levels of potassium in blood
  • Muscle weakness, myasthenia gravis
  • Any history of heart disease
  • Aneurysm
  • Diabetes or low blood sugar
  • You or family history of long QT syndrome
  • Brain tumor, head injury or seizures
  • Liver or kidney disease
  • Nerve problems
  • If pregnant or breastfeeding consult your primary care provider for guidance. There is evidence that ciprofloxacin can affect the fetus and enter breast milk. Ciprofloxacin carries US FDA pregnancy category C (Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks).

Common ciprofloxacin side effects may include:

  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain
  • Headache
  • Abnormal liver function tests

Seek medical attention if you experience:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction to ciprofloxacin (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction
  • Low blood sugar – hunger, irritability, nausea, fast heart rate, or feeling shaky
  • Nerve damage symptoms – numbness, crawling, pins and needles or tingling, burning pain in your hands, arms, legs, or feet
  • Serious mood or behavior changes – nervousness, agitation, hallucinations, memory problems, thoughts of suicide
  • Bloody or black, tarry stools

Discontinue and seek immediate medical attention if you experience:

  • Severe pain in your chest, stomach, or back (a rare but serious side effect of ciprofloxacin) which may damage the aorta, leading to bleeding or death
  • Fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, shortness of breath, and sudden dizziness (like you might pass out)
  • Muscle weakness
  • Breathing problems
  • Little or no urination
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • Increased pressure inside the skull – severe headaches, ringing in your ears, vision problems, pain behind your eyes.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

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Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

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Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

Prepared Equals Peace of Mind

Prepared equals peace of mind

What is labeled “prepping” or being a “prepper” used to be how everyone lived as recent as 50 years
ago. Our just- in- time supply chains weren’t around back then. Amazon, and online shopping didn’t
exist. Back then, if you wanted something you had to either call the company and place an order or mail
a check in.

The Sears catalog, along with many other catalogs would arrive and you and your family would spend
hours poring over the pages. These pages were filled with almost anything you may need or want, from
bed sheets to tools for the shop. In essence, those catalogs were the modern-day equivalent of Amazon.
Sometimes it would take a month or so for the much-awaited order to arrive. This was normal. Back
then, if you wanted something you had to plan for it.

Just in time supply chain

Fast forward to today. With all the wonderful technology, the same day deliveries, and almost any item
at our disposal within a few days, we have become complacent. Don’t get me wrong, we have used this
system to receive much needed items, in some cases almost immediately. This is the wonder of our
technological age. But it comes at a price. We take for granted that these supply chains will always be
running smoothly. Our world economy, for the past several decades has made life more convenient and
opened our lives to new experiences and time saving devices.
Technology- double edged sword

Our global world is a double-edged sword. The convenience we so much rely on, can and has been in the
process of failing over the past few years. The consequences to our healthcare system have been
devastating. Medical supplies such as contrast dye and drugs, have been in short supply or altogether
unavailable with no end in sight. This illustrates how fragile our medical system is. We are only one
natural or manmade disaster, pandemic, political or civil unrest from the complete shutdown of life
saving drugs and medical supplies.

Pharmaceuticals outsourced

The last major pharmaceutical manufacturing operation closed its doors and left the United States in
2004. Since then, nearly all the active ingredients for antibiotics and chronic medications – even
vitamins – are produced overseas, mainly in China and India.
Take, for instance the current amoxicillin shortage.

Across the country many pharmacies have reported a limited or not available supply of amoxicillin.
Amoxicillin is one of the first antibiotics used to treat strep throat, ear infections, urinary tract infections
and many other infections. The shortage includes amoxicillin in pill form, powder to mix with water to
make a suspension, and chewable tablets.

The American Society of Healthcare Pharmacists maintains a database of drug shortages and
manufacturers. They have listed amoxicillin manufacturers who have reported shortages or no
availability.

• Aurobindo, with facilities located throughout the world, refuses to provide availability
information.
• Hikma, based out of the UK, did not provide a reason for the shortage.
• Rising, based out of New Jersey has amoxicillin capsules and tablets available, but doesn’t state
whether they have amoxicillin powder available
• Sandoz, headquartered in Switzerland did not provide a reason for the shortage.
• Teva, which is based out of Israel did not provide a reason for the shortage.

However, the FDA states the only shortage is amoxicillin in powder form. This is because if even one
manufacturer can supply the necessary drug there is no perceived shortage.

This is very disturbing. All it takes is that one manufacturer to declare either a shortage or the drug
not available at all and the US supply is dried up.

Augmentin, (amoxicillin / clavulanate) is one of the antibiotics included in the Jase Case (see below how
to order a Jase Case). This can be substituted for amoxicillin if amoxicillin isn’t available.

Generics less likely to be manufactured

An analysis conducted by the US Pharmacopeia, a group that sets standards around the world for
medicines, found that antibiotics are 42% more likely to be in shortage in the US compared to other
types of drugs. Most antibiotics are now generic.

According to an analysis by the FDA Report “Drug Shortages: Root Causes and Potential Solutions”
identified three root causes of drug shortages.

1. Lack of incentives for manufacturers to produce less profitable drugs. (Generics aren’t very
profitable)
2. The market does not recognize and reward manufacturers for “mature quality systems” that
focus on continuous improvement and early detection of supply chain issues; and
3. Logistical and regulatory challenges make it difficult for the market to recover from a disruption.
The fragile global supply chains mean that if a pharmaceutical factory is down in China, you may not be
able to find your prescription at the neighborhood pharmacy. Lifesaving antibiotics are at risk of running
out faster than any other medicine. Medicines that are now available could easily run out. This could
lead to dire consequences.

Jase Medical is on a mission

JASE Medical is a telemedicine company with a singular focus to change all of that. This platform offers
access to basic emergency preparedness medications for every family in America.

And how will they do that? Well, it won’t happen overnight. But JASE Medical has done its homework
and established a nationwide network of physicians trained to evaluate individual needs, assess
conditions, and prescribe appropriate prescriptions for emergency preparedness purposes. From there,
licensed pharmacists fill your prescription, and the Jase Case is sent to your home.

These are the medications that will become lifesaving for you and the people you care about. And it’s all
done online through the JASE Medical portal.

How it works

When you log on to the platform and begin your consultation, you will find a simple and user-friendly
experience. The consultation takes little over five minutes to complete. After a licensed Jase healthcare
provider has reviewed your health history and any allergic reactions to medications, your prescriptions
are filled, and your Jase Case is shipped to your front door.

What’s in the JASE Case?
The kit contains the following antibiotic medications:
 Amoxicillin/Clavulanate.
 Azithromycin.
 Ciprofloxacin.
 Doxycycline.
 Metronidazole.
(Substitutions are made if allergic to one of the antibiotics)

All medications carry a level of risk, but these five antibiotics were selected for their effectiveness and
optimal patient safety. Guidance from the CDC says it best: “Antibiotics … save lives, and when a patient
needs antibiotics, the benefits usually outweigh the risks of side effects and antibiotic resistance.”

Some of the infections a Jase Case can treat
 Anthrax, plague and tularemia (resulting from bioterror).
 Bite wounds.
 Cellulitis.
 Diverticulitis.
 Intra-abdominal infections.
 Tooth infections.
 Ear infections.
 Pneumonia.
 Sinusitis.
 Strep throat.
 Urinary tract infection.
 and more.

When access to your healthcare provider isn’t possible (you are on vacation, etc.) your Jase case
includes a symptom and antibiotic use handbook titled the “Emergency Antibiotic Guide “with easy-to-
follow instructions to ensure proper use of the antibiotics if indicated.
What about chronic conditions?

Soon, the JASE Medical platform will provide emergency preparedness medicines for those with chronic
medical conditions (such as blood pressure and other chronic conditions). JASE Medical’s same
physician network will assess your condition and the need for appropriate preparedness medicines.

Ongoing support

As part of its mission to prepare you medically, JASE Medical provides unlimited ongoing support from
their physician network for questions about any of the medications prescribed.

What about shelf life?

The good news about antibiotics is that they last longer than you think. The FDA’s Shelf-Life Extension
Program found that 88% of the drugs studied maintained their potency and safety beyond the published
expiration date. The extended usability of these medications ranged from 5.5 years to as many as 23
years beyond their printed expiration!

The JASE Case antibiotics all carry the FDA’s required expiration dates. JASE Medical endorses those
dates.

Value and peace of mind

At the end of the day, this is all about peace of mind and knowing that you are ready for the
unexpected. Knowing that you have found a solution, priced at a fraction of what it would otherwise
cost you, adds to that peace of mind.

Go to JaseMedical.com and secure your emergency medications, an emergency antibiotic guide,
unlimited physician consultation and a team of professionals who are on a mission to keep you and your
loved ones prepared and safe during these uncertain times.

- Brooke Lounsbury

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

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Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

KidCase now has Rx Dexamethasone (for Croup and Asthma) added at no extra cost!

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