Educational Series | JASE Medical

Water, Water Everywhere, But None to Drink

The devastation hurricane Ian, a category 4 hurricane, caused over the past week and weekend cannot be overstated.

 As of Monday, the death toll has risen to over 100. Over 2.7 million people lost electric power and as of Monday afternoon more than 600,000 were still without power. Widespread flooding has caused sewers to overflow, and authorities are advising people to treat floodwaters as contaminated. Florida hospitals in the Ft. Myers area, along with nursing homes have been forced to evacuate thousands of patients because of lack of sanitary water due to power outages; electricity powers the water pumps. In one Ft Myer hospital, workers and patients were forced to defecate into bags and stack them up in the overflowing biohazard bin. With the inability to even wash their hands, diseases will rapidly spread.  

This is just the beginning of a massive health crisis in the making. Hepatitis, infectious diarrhea, e coli, and a host of other bacterial, viral and fungal diseases will soon emerge from this natural disaster.  It is not known when or where power will be restored. Boil orders for tap water are widespread throughout Florida. The entire medical infrastructure is under severe strain or has collapsed. It is going to take months for life to return to some semblance of normal for the residents of Florida and many coastal areas up the Eastern seaboard. 

The following are some information sites for residents of Florida:

 Education series

Our education series continues with common school age illnesses

Sinusitis (Sinus infection)

Sinus infections, also called sinusitis, happen when fluid builds up in the air-filled pockets in the face (sinuses). This fluid buildup allows germs to grow. Viruses cause most sinus infections, but bacteria and mold can also cause sinus infections.

3 types of sinusitis:

Acute bacterial sinusitis- This term refers to a sudden onset of cold symptoms such as runny nose, stuffy nose, and facial pain that does not go away after 10 days, or symptoms that seem to improve but then return and are worse.

Chronic sinusitis- Refers to symptoms such as increased facial pressure, headache, runny or stuffy nose that lasts for more than 12 weeks

Subacute sinusitis- Symptoms that last for 4-12 weeks

Recurrent acute sinusitis- Symptoms that come back four or more times in one year and last less than two weeks each time.

Causes of Sinusitis

  • Nasal and seasonal allergies, including allergy to mold
  • Common cold
  • Polyps
  • Deviated septum
  • Weakened immune system from previous illness

Common signs and symptoms:

  • Nasal discharge, can be clear, light colored, yellow or green
  • Facial pain or pressure
  • Headache- especially around nose, eyes and forehead
  • Mucus dripping down the throat (post-nasal drip)
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Bad breath

How is it spread:

For infants and young children:

    • Sharing pacifiers, toys or drinking cups
    • Not covering mouth when coughing
  • Sneezing without covering face

Adults:

    • Smokers are at higher risk for nasal infections than the nonsmoking population
    • Not washing hands
  • Not covering face when coughing or sneezing

How to treat:

If symptoms are mild over the counter decongestants, saline sprays, nasal irrigations and increasing fluids can help relieve symptoms of sinusitis.

If symptoms don’t improve after 10 days, contact your healthcare provider. You may be prescribed an antibiotic if it is determined to be bacterial in origin.

If sinusitis is recurring a visit to the ENT may be in order. Polyps or deviated septum may be the cause of recurrent infections. 

When to seek medical care:

If symptoms don’t go away after 10 days your healthcare provider may prescribe antibiotics if the infection is bacterial, along with prescription steroid sprays. Seek medical attention if facial pain or headache are severe, there is swelling around the eyes, or if symptoms seem to improve then get worse. 

Healthcare tip of the week 

Did you know that rinsing your sinuses out (called nasal lavage) with salt water was demonstrated to have an 8.5-fold reduction in Covid related hospitalizations and no fatalities compared to controls, according to a study released September 14,2022

Nasal lavage also works wonders for those suffering seasonal allergies by rinsing the irritant out of the nasal cavity. Many report symptom relief by performing the nasal lavage in the evening and upon awakening. 

Neti pots (see link for more information)are inexpensive and widely available and are a handy item to accomplish nasal lavage with. Caution: Use only purified water, not tap water in the neti pot. There have been rare cases of infection from water supply when tap water was used in the neti pot.

Gargling with salt water has similar benefits:

“A study released in September 2020 indicated that gargling with a saline-based solution can reduce viral load in COVID-19, and another released in 2021 suggested that saline works multiple ways to reduce cold symptoms related to infection with other coronaviruses and might work as well as a first-line intervention for COVID-19.“ (News Medical Life Sciences)

Pick up your Jase case now if you haven’t done so:

The Jase case contains several different antibiotics that can treat infectious diarrhea.

Infectious diarrhea is one of the most common waterborne illnesses facing the victims of Hurricane Ian in its aftermath. 

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

When you maintain a healthy weight, your overall health and ability to care for the sick and injured is enhanced. Preparedness isn’t just first aid and readiness during adverse weather events and home safety.  According to the CDC: The US obesity prevalence was 41.9%...

Hand, Foot, Mouth Disease

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is often confused with foot-and-mouth disease (also called hoof-and-mouth disease), which affects cows, sheep, and pigs.

Humans do not get the animal disease, and animals do not get the human disease.

What is it:

Hand, foot and mouth disease can be spread by two different viruses, however it is most commonly spread by the coxsackievirus. It is highly contagious and is a common childhood illness. HFMD is common in children under the age of 10, but any age can contract it. You can contract the disease more than once, however the symptoms will be less severe.

The virus can sometimes spread to others for days or weeks after symptoms go away or if they have no symptoms at all (carriers of the virus).

How is it spread:

HFMD is most contagious during the first week when a person is sick.

This highly contagious virus is spread through contact with:

  • Nasal and throat secretions (saliva, drool or nasal mucus)
  • Fluid from scabs or blisters
  • Poop (not using hygienic bathroom practices)

Common signs and symptoms:

  •  
  • Sore throat.
  • Feeling sick.
  • Painful, blister-like lesions on the tongue, gums and inside of the cheeks. These lesions can lead to poor appetite or risk of dehydration due to pain when attempting to eat or drink.
  • A blister like rash on the palms, soles of the feet and sometimes the buttocks. The rash is not itchy. The blisters are usually small, oval, and white, and are usually not found on the trunk.
  • Fussiness in infants and toddlers.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Symptoms usually last from 7-10 days after becoming infected.

 

How to treat:

Antibiotics do not work on viruses and are not given to children with HFMD. HFMD will get better on its own.

  • Tylenol or ibuprofen. Ask your care provider what they recommend for pain relief.
  • Be sure to offer liquids to prevent dehydration.
  • Do not squeeze or otherwise pierce blisters. The fluid contained in the blisters is highly contagious.

When to seek medical care:

If your child is unwell with a fever and a skin rash (small bright red spots or purple spots or unexplained bruises) that does not turn to skin-color (blanch) when you press on it, this may be a sign of meningococcal infection (see  Meningococcal infection).(This is a very rare occurrence)

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

When you maintain a healthy weight, your overall health and ability to care for the sick and injured is enhanced. Preparedness isn’t just first aid and readiness during adverse weather events and home safety.  According to the CDC: The US obesity prevalence was 41.9%...

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

A Terrifying Drug Targeted at Children- Rainbow Fentanyl

Authorities across the nation have started sounding the alarm over an influx of a highly dangerous drug flooding our country. Police and authorities are on high alert in their respective areas for rainbow fentanyl, a highly potent drug aimed at children and teens.  

Rainbow fentanyl is fentanyl, a synthetic opioid dyed bright colors and is found in pill and powder form. The tablets resemble candy, and the powder form resembles the color and consistency of sidewalk chalk. Chewable vitamins laced with fentanyl has also been reported.

Reports are coming in that this dangerous drug has hit the streets of:

  • Portland- where Multnomah County sheriff’s deputies seized about 4 ounces of multi-colored fentanyl powder from a safe. The powder form is more potent therefore more dangerous that the pressed pill form (pills are mixed with fillers and other drugs, or are laced with fentanyl)
  • Arizona- The Port of Nolgales director tweeted that border patrol officers had seized colored fentanyl pills two days in a row. Michael Humphries said in addition to 15,000 pills found, 250,000 fentanyl pills were seized the day before, some of which were multi-colored.
  • California- Placer County officials are warning that rainbow fentanyl has made it to their area. The DA’s office said there’s been a 450% increase in fentanyl deaths in Placer County from 2018 to 2021. Nearly half of the deaths have been in people under 25 years old.

Police seized 6 kilograms of fentanyl hidden in a car in the city of Oakland

50 pounds of fentanyl hidden in the battery compartment and spare tire of a car was seized by police in Temecula

The DEA in Los Angeles reports record breaking seizure of on million fentanyl pills

  • Washington DC– According to Jennifer Lofland, Field Intelligence Manager for DEA Washington division, pills have been seized in and around D.C. for at least the last 18 months.
  • Virginia– Morgantown police seized a significant amount (quantity not disclosed) of rainbow fentanyl.
  • Kentucky- Over 50,000 lethal doses of fentanyl were seized by US customs in Louisville earlier this month
  • Montana- Through June 30, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (RMHIDTA) task forces seized 111,611 fentanyl dosage units in Montana. This number includes 17,892 fentanyl dosage units combined with 20.66 fentanyl pounds converted to dosage units.

Where is all this fentanyl coming from?

According to US customs and border patrol, fentanyl seizures across the Mexican-US borders have skyrocketed over the past year. In 2021 total amount of fentanyl seized was about 9,000 pounds, so far this year they have seized 10,200 pounds of fentanyl. Most of the fentanyl seized is manufactured in illicit labs in Mexico, where it is cheap and easy to manufacture.

It comes in many forms and doesn’t take much to be fatal

Fentanyl exposure can take many forms, not just pill form. Fentanyl can also be absorbed into the body via inhalation, or skin contact. It only takes the amount of fentanyl equal to 3 grains of salt to be fatal.

From the CDC website:

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. It is a major contributor to fatal and nonfatal overdoses in the U.S. Over 150 people die every day from overdoses related to synthetic opioids like fentanyl.

There are two types of fentanyl: pharmaceutical fentanyl and illicitly manufactured fentanyl. Both are considered synthetic opioids. Pharmaceutical fentanyl is prescribed by doctors to treat severe pain, especially after surgery and for advanced-stage cancer.

Illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) is available on the drug market in different forms, including liquid and powder.

Street drugs, aka illicit drugs don’t come with an ingredient list

Powdered fentanyl looks just like many other drugs. It is commonly mixed with drugs like heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine and made into pills that are made to resemble other prescription opioids. Fentanyl-laced drugs are extremely dangerous, and many people may be unaware that their drugs are laced with fentanyl.

In its liquid form, IMF can be found in nasal sprays, eye drops, and dropped onto paper or small candies.

Signs of overdose

Recognizing the signs of opioid overdose can save a life. Here are some things to look for:

  • Small, constricted “pinpoint pupils”
  • Falling asleep or losing consciousness
  • Slow, weak, or no breathing
  • Choking or gurgling sounds
  • Limp body
  • Cold and/or clammy skin
  • Discolored skin (especially in lips and nails)

What to do if you think someone is overdosing

It may be hard to tell whether a person is high or experiencing an overdose. If you aren’t sure, treat it like an overdose—you could save a life.

  1. Call 911 immediately
  2. Administer naloxone if available (Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can reverse the effects of opioid overdose and save lives. It is available in all 50 states and can be purchased from a local pharmacy without a prescription in most states.)
  3. Try to keep the person awake and breathing
  4. Lay the person on their side to prevent choking
  5. Stay with the person until help arrives

Get educated

Families against Fentanyl website was started by a family who lost their son to a fentanyl overdose. This site offers several researched articles, up to date information and a petition that has been introduced to the house of representatives stating that fentanyl should be labeled as a weapon of mass destruction. According to their calculations, using CDC statistics , fentanyl overdose now surpasses all other causes of death in the 18-45 age group, including suicide and car wrecks.

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

When you maintain a healthy weight, your overall health and ability to care for the sick and injured is enhanced. Preparedness isn’t just first aid and readiness during adverse weather events and home safety.  According to the CDC: The US obesity prevalence was 41.9%...

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

Education Series: Back To School

Bedtime Routine 

A consistent sleep schedule is essential for children to tackle their day-to-day tasks. With school starting, it has never been more important to cultivate good sleep habits.

The CDC recommends children ages 3-5 years get 10-13 hours of sleep a night, children ages 6-12 get 9-12 hours of sleep, and children ages 13-18 get 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Sleep is critical to help prevent attention or behavior problems, injuries, poor mental health, obesity and type 2 diabetes. 

Here are some tips for good sleep and a balanced bedtime routine:

  • Set wakeup and bedtimes at the same time (including weekends)
  • Remove electronic devices from bedrooms
  • Incorporate soothing activities like a warm bath, brushing teeth, and a bedtime story
  • Avoid caffeine and large meals before bed
  • Keep the bedroom quiet and at a comfortable temperature
  • Keep your routine short and sweet

Healthy Snack Ideas 

After a long day at school, kids come home ready to eat! Here are a few simple snack ideas that are healthy, quick, and fun:

  • Hummus and veggies
  • String cheese and pretzels
  • Fruit kabobs with dip
  • Apple nachos (slice apples, drizzle with peanut butter and sprinkle with chocolate chips)
  • Green smoothies
  • Trail Mix
  • Crackers with cheese slices
  • Popcorn trail mix (popcorn, chocolate chips and peanuts)
  • Cheese quesadillas

Safety First Mindset 

As children are preparing to return to school, parents prep them with the essentials-school supplies, backpacks, new shoes, and new clothes. But one important tool they may miss is a safety first mindset. To help with back to school preparations, here are a few simple safety tips:

  • When walking to school use crosswalks, a safe route to and from school, and have them travel in a group
  • Wear a helmet when riding bikes or scooters to and from school
  • Teach children where pickup and drop-off zones are located
  • Dress children in comfortable shoes and clothing for outdoor activities and recess
  • Teach children about the danger of strangers and what to do when approached by one
  • Invest in a good backpack with 2 workable straps

Yearly Influenza Vaccine 

Doctors recommend the yearly flu vaccine for children 6 months old and older. The most crucial time to receive the vaccine is by the end of October before the flu begins spreading in your community. Shared supplies, close contact, extended periods of time together, and limited hand washing make schools the perfect place to spread Influenza. This virus spreads easily and can cause serious illness for young children and people with chronic conditions like asthma and diabetes. There are many benefits to getting the flu vaccine every year – reducing the risk of contracting the flu, reducing the severity of illness in people who are vaccinated and getting sick, reducing the risk of hospitalization associated with the flu, and helping protect people who you associate with. 

Separation Anxiety 

The transition back to school after summer ends can be a stressful time for both kids and their parents. Here are some tips to help ease your child’s back to school anxiety:

  • Visit your child’s school before the school year starts. Rehearsing the drop-off and taking a look at the classroom (if the building is open) can help relieve stress for your child
  • Research shows that the presence of a familiar friend during back-to-school transitions can improve your child’s academic and emotional adjustment. Plan a playdate with a familiar peer before school starts
  • Plan a rewarding activity for your child that they could earn by separating from parents to attend school
  • Validate and acknowledge your child’s worry. Going back to school can be a stressful time! But, like any new activity, starting school can start off as hard but soon becomes enjoyable

Lunch Time Ideas 

Keeping meals exciting and nutritious for kids can be a challenge! Packing school lunches can make it an even harder task. A healthy lunch consists of five main components. Milk, fruit, vegetables, grain and protein. Here are a few of our favorite kid-friendly food blogs so you don’t have to hunt them down:

  • Weelicious Catherine is mom to 2 kids and studied at The Institute for Culinary Education in Manhattan. Her blog focuses on quick, easy, nutritious recipes that are made using fresh, but minimal ingredients. 
  • Simple Bites Aimée is a former chef-turned modern homesteader and mom to 3 kids, 2 cats and a handful of chickens. Recipes are easy to prepare and feature unprocessed, seasonal ingredients. 
  • Teach. Eat. Love.Written by Anne, the blog was created out of her need to find healthy recipes her daughter would eat during the dreaded picky stage. You’ll find allergy-friendly recipes, lunch box ideas – even meals inspired by literature! 

Setting Goals 

Working towards and achieving goals give your child important skills such as planning, putting in hard work and managing time. Helping your child set goals before the start of the school year is a great way for them to stay motivated and on track. Make sure the goals have a purpose. Having a specific goal with a clear purpose helps to motivate your child. Don’t be afraid to adjust the goal as needed. Perhaps discuss the difference between a short-term goal and a long-term goal. If your child wants to give up, you can remind them of their purpose and cheer them on! 

Homework Help 

Setting goals and expectations for homework assignments with your child before they go back to school is always important. Setting aside time in the evening to help your child with their homework assignments can create good study habits and with the help of an adult, can motivate them to stay up-to-date on tasks. Try making “homework time” enjoyable for your child. Motivate them with something they can earn, or reward them for completing their homework on time. 

Back to school can be a stressful time! Make sure you and your child are prepared before the school bell rings.

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

Maintain or Attain a Healthy Weight

When you maintain a healthy weight, your overall health and ability to care for the sick and injured is enhanced. Preparedness isn’t just first aid and readiness during adverse weather events and home safety.  According to the CDC: The US obesity prevalence was 41.9%...

Sign up for our Newsletter!

Keeping you informed and safe.