health - JASE Medical

Keep Those New Years Resolutions by Doing This

The 6 Ps to Success

According to a October 2023 Forbes Health survey of New Years resolutions that 62% of the general population felt pressured to make New Years resolutions. Fitness (48%), finances (38%), improved mental health (36%) and losing weight (34%) were the top resolutions cited for 2024.

Many of these resolutions are thrown by the wayside by the end of January. In fact, January 17th is designated as the unofficial “Ditch New Years resolution day”, a day that many people give up on their resolutions, with the average resolution lasting just 3.74 months. The Forbes survey further revealed that only 8% stick with their goals for one month, 22% last two months and 13% last four months.

New Years resolutions are easy to make, but harder to keep.

Old patterns of life can sneak back into our lives without us realizing it.

Good intentions aren’t enough.

We start with a resolute heart, that this year will be different. However, as we resume our daily lives post holidays, we haven’t established habits that motivate us to push forward and accomplish our goals.

Let’s make this year different.

We have put together a downloadable pdf that will kickstart and motivate you to stay on course. 

Download and print this pdf and lets get started. Give yourself at least 30 minutes to prioritize, plan and prepare for your goal.

Prioritize

Under prioritize, write down your 5 most pressing or important goals you want to achieve this year.

Assign them a number- 1-5, 1 being the most important or pressing goal.

As you do this, state why these goals are important and what your desired outcome is.

Example:

Goal-I want to lose 20 pounds by the beginning of summer.

Reason- I will have more energy, fit into summer clothes, and feel better about my appearance.

Number of importance- 1

Do this for each of your goals.

Once you have assigned numbers, it is time to move to:

Plan

Most goals that aren’t met are because of lack of proper planning.

There are 3 parts to planning your goal. The goal must be specific, measurable, and most importantly, realistic.

Take the above example of losing weight:

Specific- lose 20 pounds

Measurable- by beginning of summer

Realistic- Losing 20 pounds over 6 months (by June) is a reasonable and realistic goal

Make as detailed of a plan as possible as to how you wish to accomplish this goal. Leave room for changing tactics but keep the outcome fresh in your mind. Imagine how you will feel reaching this goal. Do this exercise several times during the day. Especially upon arising and right before bed.

If losing weight is your objective, you will need to:

Plan meals- either home cooked or from a restaurant menu.

Home cooked meals will be healthier but require menu planning, grocery shopping and food preparation.

Eating out requires careful planning and deciding beforehand what you are going to order. Otherwise, the smells and atmosphere can cause you to skip your resolution “just this one time”.

Prepare

Planning and preparation go hand in hand. Whether your goal is weight loss, travel, or exercise goals-, proper preparation will set you up for success.

Weight loss could involve weekly weigh-ins and tracking. If your goal is to run a half marathon, proper footwear and setting distance goals to run leading up to the half marathon could be part of your preparation. If travel abroad is your goal, obtaining or renewing your passport well before your trip is necessary.

Position

Positioning yourself for success means having all the tools and systems in place. Go back to reviewing your goals and preparations. Are there any obstacles you see that could keep you from achieving success? If so, how can you mitigate these obstacles?

There will always be obstacles, some we can anticipate and others that we cannot. The most important thing is to have an action plan if your goals go wayside. Being flexible and staying focused on your goal(s) is important. If you go off your diet, are unable to meet your exercise goal, unable to take the trip when you wanted are just a few examples of plans going wayside (which in most likelihood they will at some point).

Persistence

Of all the P’s, persistence is the key to success. If your plans don’t work out the way you want them to, re-evaluate and focus on how you can meet your goal(s). Go back to the plan and preparation exercise and rework your activities until you are able to position yourself for success. Remember, failure is giving up! Discipline and persistence wins the race. Remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? The hare started out far ahead, got distracted and the slow, consistent turtle eventually won. Stay the course. If you get diverted, get back on track. Don’t beat yourself up, use this as a learning experience to help you revise and stay the course.

Progress

Each day, or at the very least, each week reserve time- at least 15 minutes- to review your progress. Focus on what worked, how you could do better and revise as necessary. Keep your goal(s) front and center and remember why you made them in the first place. Spend time visualizing how you will feel once you have reached your goal.

By working through these 6Ps, you will achieve our goals.

Make 2024 your year for positive change. Here is to a healthy and prosperous New Year!

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Planning a Cruise?

Planning a Cruise?

Be sure to pack these Jase add-ons An outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea has been reported on the luxury cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. As of last count, at least 154 people have taken ill since the ship set sail in early January. The number of passengers on board...

read more
A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

Could you be next?Early this week an Oregon resident was diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first diagnosed case in nearly a decade. It is believed the person contracted the disease from their cat. Cats that hunt rodents can become infected and spread the...

read more
Antibiotic Shortage Leads to Increase in Syphilis Cases

Antibiotic Shortage Leads to Increase in Syphilis Cases

According to the CDC: “Reported syphilis cases increased 80% in the United States between 2018 and 2022, (from 115,000 to more than 207,000), compounding a decades-long upward trend. If untreated, syphilis can seriously damage the heart and brain and can cause...

read more
Ivermectin for Scabies- and More

Ivermectin for Scabies- and More

Discovered in the late 1970s and approved as a commercial product for animal health in 1981, ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug was initially used by veterinarians to treat mite and heartworm infections. In 1988, ivermectin was approved to treat Onchocerciasis (known...

read more

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

Avoid A Holiday Heart Attack By doing This

Heart attacks are highest December 25th, avoid being a statistic.

Holidays can be a time of connecting with loved ones that you don’t normally connect with. It is also the time when strained relationships magnify because of family get togethers. Either way, holidays have a way of bringing on intense feelings and expectations that are rarely met in real life. Changes in health, loss of or additions of family members (passing of a loved one, marriage, birth, adoption, etc.) job loss, (or new job) and even pressure to show up at holiday gatherings when you may not be able to afford presents change the family dynamics and add additional stress to the holiday season.

Our activities and stress levels

Filling our lives with activities we really don’t want to do or have little meaning sets you up for depression and a downward spiral of emotions. Manage stress through eliminating meaningless chores and responsibilities taken on during past years. This will free you to experience a fulfilling life rooted in meaning and purpose.

Set Realistic Expectations and Priorities

Remember, you are in control

Hallmark movies, retailers and clever marketing have played on our emotions and can lead us to feel inadequate. Decide what is truly important and makes the holiday season special If you now have additional responsibilities, life changes or just don’t care for the holiday season. Don’t overextend yourself by accepting invites to parties and get togethers unless it fits into a realistic schedule.

Streamline your schedule and commitments

Let all involved know this year will be different (if it is) and why.

  • If travel is difficult, set up zoom calls to connect with family and loved ones. Zoom calls are an ideal way to connect if you or your family are dealing with a major health challenge. By doing this, you avoid extended travel, exposure to viruses and disruption to your daily schedule.
  • Invite people to your home around your schedule. Ask anyone who is sick or has been exposed to anyone ill to stay home.

Prioritize your health

Communicate your needs and what you can do that won’t stretch your limits. Overextending yourself, along with poor diet and lack of sleep can set you on a downward spiral of depressive thoughts and emotions. These emotions lower your immune system and can set you up for increased risk of heart attacks and other cardiovascular events.

  • Have your prescriptions refilled in advance. You avoid lengthy waiting times in lines, exposure to seasonal viruses, and you won’t run out at the most inopportune time. It is also a great time to use your HSA (before years end) and buy a Jase Case or refill chronic medications with Jase Daily if you haven’t already.
  • Maximize your vitamin D level, either by spending time in the sun or using supplements. Vitamin D is a powerful immune booster.
  • Avoid sugar and alcohol. Both can bring on depressive moods (which, in turn, lowers immunity).
  • Take time for yourself – go for a walk, take a hot bath, shut off the phone and read – whatever you can do to energize. Your heart and immune system will thank you for it!
  • Prioritize your mental and physical health. Eat a healthy meal before you head to festivities or get togethers. If you struggle with alcohol addiction, either avoid the activity or bring an accountability partner to support and encourage abstinence.
  • Get good quality sleep. Keep your sleep schedule as close to normal as possible. Our bodies repair and rejuvenate more during our sleep cycles than at any other time of day.
  • Cold weather puts stress on the heart. Layer clothing, and pace yourself when engaging in outdoor activities.

Men and women can have a different set of symptoms during a heart attack. Download and print this pdf. Hang it in a highly visible spot of your home. Don’t ignore symptoms by wishing them away. The sooner you seek help the higher your chances of survival.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Planning a Cruise?

Planning a Cruise?

Be sure to pack these Jase add-ons An outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea has been reported on the luxury cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. As of last count, at least 154 people have taken ill since the ship set sail in early January. The number of passengers on board...

read more
A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

Could you be next?Early this week an Oregon resident was diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first diagnosed case in nearly a decade. It is believed the person contracted the disease from their cat. Cats that hunt rodents can become infected and spread the...

read more
Antibiotic Shortage Leads to Increase in Syphilis Cases

Antibiotic Shortage Leads to Increase in Syphilis Cases

According to the CDC: “Reported syphilis cases increased 80% in the United States between 2018 and 2022, (from 115,000 to more than 207,000), compounding a decades-long upward trend. If untreated, syphilis can seriously damage the heart and brain and can cause...

read more
Ivermectin for Scabies- and More

Ivermectin for Scabies- and More

Discovered in the late 1970s and approved as a commercial product for animal health in 1981, ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug was initially used by veterinarians to treat mite and heartworm infections. In 1988, ivermectin was approved to treat Onchocerciasis (known...

read more

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

Medical Preparedness – Diabetes

Do you have an extra glucometer in your supplies?

A chronic condition such as diabetes can be life threatening if our fragile medical supply chain is disrupted and medication or supplies to test are not available. Having adequate supplies- an extra glucometer with test trips, batteries, and solution should be in every diabetic’s medical kit. Whether you are type 1, 2 or gestational diabetic having the extra glucometer and supplies is vital. Nowadays, glucometers there are so many high-tech glucometers- ones that use a thin needle under the skin and read glucose levels every few minutes and alert user if levels are out of range, to blood free sensors that use flashing light to take glucose readings- and even more. Even though technology is wonderful, relying on it can be dangerous. Glucometers can fail by giving incorrect readings or stop working altogether. It is important to have another glucometer, preferably one that isn’t as high tech to measure the reading against or in case of altogether failure. In addition, make sure you have an adequate supply of medication- both oral and injectable insulin (along with supplies) in case these drugs aren’t available for an extended period of time. Aim for at least 6-month supply of drugs and supplies. Even more would be better.

Always check with the diabetic and observe for symptoms of hypo/hyperglycemia. If glucose readings are within normal limits established by their care provider but they exhibit symptoms of poor glucose control, retake glucose with alternate glucometer. Contact primary care provider or healthcare professional if needed.

Diabetes testing and lab values

The following are excerpts from the CDC website:

Tests for Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Prediabetes

A1C Test

The A1C test measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 or 3 months. An A1C below 5.7% is normal, between 5.7 and 6.4% indicates you have prediabetes, and 6.5% or higher indicates you have diabetes.

Fasting Blood Sugar Test

This measures your blood sugar after an overnight fast (not eating). A fasting blood sugar level of 99 mg/dL or lower is normal, 100 to 125 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 126 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes.

Glucose Tolerance Test

This measures your blood sugar before and after you drink a liquid that contains glucose. You’ll fast (not eat) overnight before the test and have your blood drawn to determine your fasting blood sugar level. Then you’ll drink the liquid and have your blood sugar level checked 1 hour, 2 hours, and possibly 3 hours afterward. At 2 hours, a blood sugar level of 140 mg/dL or lower is considered normal, 140 to 199 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes.

Random Blood Sugar Test

This measures your blood sugar at the time you’re tested. You can take this test at any time and don’t need to fast (not eat) first. A blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes.

5 things you can do to improve blood sugar – prediabetic or diabetic

  1. Get moving

Exercise of any form contributes to overall health and is a valuable tool in managing glucose levels. Even a brisk walk has benefits. If you haven’t been exercising, take it slow and easy. The key is to be consistent. If walking, aim for at least 30 minutes a day 5 days a week. Studies reveled that walking 30 minutes a day reduced blood sugar readings by 25 percent. Once you have mastered this, consider HIIT- high intensity interval training-short bursts of intense exercise alternated with low intensity recovery periods. Studies show that this form of exercise has the more powerful effect on glucose control than other forms of exercise. Consult with your primary care provider before embarking on any new exercise regimen.

  1. Reduce stress

High stress hormones prevent the pancreas from producing insulin. When under stress, stress hormones such as glucagon and epinephrine are released and reduce glucose uptake in the muscle. When this happens, more glucose is circulating in the blood, causing hyperglycemia. Ways to manage and reduce stress include journaling, exercise, meditate, connect with others, and my personal favorite, deep breathing. Johns Hopkins Medicine has a good video on deep breathing and stress reduction.

  1. Follow diabetic diet and consider intermittent fasting (IF)- only under the supervision of a healthcare professional

If you are prediabetic or type 2 diabetic intermittent fasting- when you eat in a restricted time frame- for example eat 8 hours and fast 16- has proven health benefits, including the ability to lower blood sugar and in some cases reverse diabetes and insulin resistance (Insulin resistance is when muscles, fat, and liver cells don’t respond well to insulin and can’t easily take up glucose from your blood.)

There are downsides to intermittent fasting. If you are taking medication to lower blood glucose IF could potentially cause a hypoglycemic episode. In addition, with type 1 diabetics, IF can cause hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  1. Get good quality sleep- at least 7 hours a night

Too little sleep can affect glucose levels by:

  • Increasing insulin resistance.
  • Make you hungrier the next day and reduce how full you feel after eating and causes the hunger hormone grehlin to increase
  • Make you more likely to reach for junk foods—those that are high in carbs and sugar.
  1. Stay hydrated and don’t get overheated

Dehydration can lead to an increase in blood glucose because the blood is more concentrated.

Also, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to widen, which in turn causes insulin to absorb more quickly, leading to low blood sugar.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Next time we may not be so lucky.United Health group learned Wednesday of a cyber security threat  that had accessed some of their information technology systems. Change Healthcare, one of the nation’s largest health-care technology companies and a subsidiary of...

Planning a Cruise?

Planning a Cruise?

Be sure to pack these Jase add-ons An outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea has been reported on the luxury cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. As of last count, at least 154 people have taken ill since the ship set sail in early January. The number of passengers on board...

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

Could you be next?Early this week an Oregon resident was diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first diagnosed case in nearly a decade. It is believed the person contracted the disease from their cat. Cats that hunt rodents can become infected and spread the...

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

The Ongoing Adderall Shortage

The ongoing Adderall shortage seems to have no end. Teva, the largest manufacturer of Adderall, is experiencing “ongoing intermittent manufacturing delays” due to increased demand. Every year, the DEA sets a quota — a limit on the amount of raw materials for many controlled substances, like Adderall. This is based in part on the Food and Drug Administration’s estimate of the need for the drug: For 2023, the FDA estimated just over 38,000 kilograms of amphetamine would be sufficient to meet the demand for Adderall and its generics – and the DEA set the quota at 42,400 kilograms, according to a DEA spokesman.

What is Adderall?

Adderall is a combination medication of Amphetamine/dextroamphetamine, used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – ADHD (attention deficit hyperactive disorder) and narcolepsy, a sleep disorder that makes one drowsy and unable to stay awake during the day.

Adderall is classified as schedule ll drug because its potential for abuse is high, due to its addictive nature. Other drugs that fall in this category are Vicodin, cocaine, fentanyl, oxycodone and Ritalin.

The Adderall shortage is affecting a large part of the U.S. population

According to the CDC:

CDC scientists found that, as of 2016, 6.1 million children aged 2-17 years living in the U.S. had been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is similar to previous estimates. Researchers also found that children living in rural areas were more likely to have been diagnosed with ADHD and less likely to receive behavioral treatment in the past year compared with children living in urban or suburban areas.

Among all children 2-17 years of age with ADHD, researchers also found:

  • 6 out of 10 (62%) were taking medication for their ADHD, and represent 1 out of 20 of all U.S. children;
  • Just under half (47%) received any behavioral treatment for their ADHD in the past year. Among the youngest children (2-5 years of age), the number increased to over half (60%);
  • Nearly two-thirds (64%) also had another mental, emotional, or behavioral disorder, such as conduct disorder, anxiety, depression, autism, and Tourette syndrome.

During the pandemic, prescriptions for ADHD medications increased significantly

Relative annual percent change in percentage of persons aged 5–64 years with at least one stimulant prescription fill, by sex and age group — MarketScan commercial databases, United States, 2016–2021

How Adderall works

It is a stimulant that works by increasing the amounts of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays a role in the “reward” center of the brain. It is released during pleasurable activities such as eating, sex, regular exercise and any activity that involves expectation of reward.

Norepinephrine affects how the brain responds to events, particularly how it pays attention and the speed with which it reacts to outside stimuli., belongs to a class of drugs known as stimulants. It can help increase your ability to pay attention, stay focused on an activity, and control behavior problems. High levels of norepinephrine activate the “fight or flight” part of the sympathetic nervous system, leading to fear and anger responses.

What non pharmaceutical interventions you can do to increase dopamine and norepinephrine

There are a wide variety of treatments available for ADHD, including medication, counseling and behavior therapy, and lifestyle changes.

  • Eat tyrosine rich foods

Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid, meaning the body can synthesize it, and is a precursor to norepinephrine and increases dopamine availability. Tyrosine rich foods include:

Beef, pork, fish chicke4n, firm tofu, milk, low fat ricotta cheese, large white beans, squash and pumpkin seeds and wild rice

  • Regular exercise

Regular, consistent exercise has been proven to increase dopamine levels in the brain. In addition, regular exercise is widely known to improve mood.

  • Balance gut health

Recent research is proving the important role your digestive system has in producing many neurotransmitters, including dopamine. Healthy microbiota in the gut leads to dopamine, serotonin and other neurotransmitters increase. Fermented foods which are rich in probiotics, kefir,yogurt with active cultures and fiber rich fruits and vegetables contribute to overall health.

  • Get good quality sleep

Sleep allows the body to repair and rejuvenate. Sleep is one of the most important and underrated activities we engage in. When rested, your body is able to hand stressors and remain more alert and focused.

  • Practice meditation or prayer

 According to a study “Increased dopamine tone during meditation-induced change of consciousness” two sets of participants were evaluated. One  set had eyes closed, and not instructed to do anything. The other set practiced focused meditation. The focused meditation group had a  65% increase in endogenous dopamine release. An increase in dopamine also occurred during a 7-day spiritual retreat.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Next time we may not be so lucky.United Health group learned Wednesday of a cyber security threat  that had accessed some of their information technology systems. Change Healthcare, one of the nation’s largest health-care technology companies and a subsidiary of...

Planning a Cruise?

Planning a Cruise?

Be sure to pack these Jase add-ons An outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea has been reported on the luxury cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. As of last count, at least 154 people have taken ill since the ship set sail in early January. The number of passengers on board...

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

Could you be next?Early this week an Oregon resident was diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first diagnosed case in nearly a decade. It is believed the person contracted the disease from their cat. Cats that hunt rodents can become infected and spread the...

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

What is Discontinuation Syndrome?

You may have heard or been told by your care provider to never stop taking your antidepressant medication abruptly and wondered why. The side effects of suddenly stopping your antidepressant can be severe and last for months or even years.

What are antidepressants?

Antidepressants are prescription drugs used to treat clinical depression. They are one of the most commonly used medications on the market. 11% of Americans over the age of 12 take antidepressant medication.

They also are used to treat:

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Panic disorders
  • Serious phobias, such as agoraphobia and social anxiety (social phobia)
  • Bulimia
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Help ease symptoms associated with nicotine or methamphetamine withdrawal

How antidepressants work

It’s thought that antidepressants work by increasing neurotransmitters. These are chemicals in the brain like serotonin and noradrenaline. They can improve mood and emotion, although this process isn’t fully understood.

Types of antidepressants

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI)

SSRIs are the most widely prescribed antidepressant. SSRIs work by increasing serotonin levels in the brain. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter (a messenger chemical that carries signals between nerve cells in the brain). It’s thought to have a good influence on mood, emotion and sleep.

After carrying a message, serotonin is usually reabsorbed by the nerve cells (known as “reuptake”). SSRIs work by blocking (“inhibiting”) reuptake, meaning more serotonin is available to pass further messages between nearby nerve cells.

A few examples are:

  • citalopram (Celexa)
  • paroxetine (Paxil)
  • sertraline (Zoloft)
  • fluoxetine (Prozac)

Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI)

SNRIs are similar to SSRIs. Evidence suggests that some people respond better to SSRIs, while others respond better to SNRIs. They are sometimes used to treat anxiety disorders and long-term (chronic) pain, especially nerve pain.

Examples of SNRIs include:

  • duloxetine (Cymbalta)
  • venlafaxine (Effexor)
  • desvenlafaxine (Pristiq)

Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA)

TCAs are an older type of antidepressant. They’re no longer usually recommended as a first-line treatment for depression. This is because they can be more dangerous if an overdose is taken. They also cause more unpleasant side effects than SSRIs and SNRIs.

People with severe depression who fail to respond to other treatments may be prescribed TCAs. TCAs may also be recommended for other mental health conditions, like OCD and bipolar disorder.

Examples of TCAs include:

  • amitriptyline
  • imipramine
  • nortriptyline
  • Some types of TCAs, like amitriptyline, can also be used to treat chronic nerve pain.

Atypical antidepressants

Atypical antidepressants work in a manner different than other antidepressants. They change the levels of one or more neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, serotonin or norepinephrine.

Examples of atypical antidepressants include:

  • Bupropion (Wellbutrin SR, Wellbutrin XL, others)
  • Mirtazapine (Remeron)

What is half life?

A half-life is the time it takes for a drug in your body to reduce by half. Half-life does not change depending on the dosage a person is taking or the amount of time they have been on medication. Half-life can vary from person to person according to their overall health and other factors.

Every drug has its own unique half-life. For instance,

SSRIs

 Most SSRIs have a half life or a day or so, except Prozac

  • Prozac (fluoxetine) has a longer half life than many other antidepressants. Depending on individual metabolism and health, it can take 1-4 days to reach half-life, and up to 30 days to be completely removed from the body.
  • Sertraline(Zoloft)-22 to 36 hours
  • Citalopram (Celexa)-36 hours
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)-24 hours

SNRIs

  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta)- 8 to 17 hours
  • Venlafaxine (Effexor)-4 to 7 hours
  • Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq)-about 11 hours

TCAs   

  • Amitriptyline- 9-25 hours
  • Imipramine- 19 hours
  • Nortriptyline-36 hours

Atypical antidepressants

  • Bupropion (Wellbutrin SR, Wellbutrin XL, others)- 33-37 hours
  • Mirtazapine (Remeron)- 20-40 hours

Discontinuation syndrome

Never go off or change the dose of your antidepressant without the guidance of your care provider.

Discontinuation syndrome occurs when an antidepressant is stopped suddenly. Depending on the half life of the drug, the symptoms can be more severe and longer lasting. Withdrawal symptoms usually come on within a few days of stopping the medicine and can last from 1 week to several months or more. Some people have severe withdrawal symptoms that last for years.

Withdrawal symptoms

Neurotransmitters are not only active in the brain but the entire body. Abruptly stopping antidepressants causes changes to neurotransmitter levels that can be felt throughout the body.

There are many mental and physical symptoms when coming off /abruptly stopping antidepressants including:

  • Mood swings, agitation, manic feelings, depression, irritability, confusion, paranoid, suicidal
  • Irritable, anxious, confused
  • Balance: dizziness, light-headedness, vertigo
  • Unusual sensations: numbness, sound hypersensitivity, “brain-zap”, which is a feeling of an electric shock to the head
  • Stomach cramps, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting
  • Insomnia, vivid dreams or nightmares
  • Restless legs, uneven gait
  • Slurred speech
  • Heat sensitivity, sweating

Given the severity of symptoms from abruptly stopping antidepressants, be sure you have enough in case of supply chain disruption. Review your medications with your care provider and have a plan in place for enough medication in the event your medication is in short supply.

- Brooke Lounsbury, RN

Medical Content Writer

Lifesaving Medications

Everyone should be empowered to care for themselves and their loved ones during the unexpected.

Recent Posts

Keeping you informed and safe.

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Massive Cyberattack Takes Down Pharmacies Worldwide

Next time we may not be so lucky.United Health group learned Wednesday of a cyber security threat  that had accessed some of their information technology systems. Change Healthcare, one of the nation’s largest health-care technology companies and a subsidiary of...

Planning a Cruise?

Planning a Cruise?

Be sure to pack these Jase add-ons An outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea has been reported on the luxury cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. As of last count, at least 154 people have taken ill since the ship set sail in early January. The number of passengers on board...

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

A Rare Case of the Plague Was Found in Oregon

Could you be next?Early this week an Oregon resident was diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first diagnosed case in nearly a decade. It is believed the person contracted the disease from their cat. Cats that hunt rodents can become infected and spread the...

Join Our Newsletter

Our mission is to help you be more medically prepared. Join our newsletter and follow us on social media for health and safety tips each week!

New Jase KidCase now available!

X